Luciféria D'ophidia
mydailycolors:

Murmur of the Forest  collage by maria zychowicz"Why do you wail, o forest trees,
Forest, without rain or breeze,"Why do you wail, o forest trees,
Forest, without rain or breeze,
Your branches ill at ease?”
Your branches ill at ease?”

mydailycolors:

Murmur of the Forest  collage by maria zychowicz"Why do you wail, o forest trees,

Forest, without rain or breeze,"Why do you wail, o forest trees,

Forest, without rain or breeze,

Your branches ill at ease?”

Your branches ill at ease?”

macrolepis:

by matthew day jackson
mandalicgeometry:

Navajo Sandpainting
 
This is a Navajo Indian Sandpainting called Whirling Logs 1 by Grey Squirrel (Fred Stevens, Jr.), Navajo Indian Sandpainter and Medicine Man.
For explanation of legend of Whirling Logs and notes on the sandpainting see here. Additional Navajo sandpaintings can be viewed here.
Photograph courtesy of Nizhoni Cards.

mandalicgeometry:

Navajo Sandpainting

 

This is a Navajo Indian Sandpainting called Whirling Logs 1 by Grey Squirrel (Fred Stevens, Jr.), Navajo Indian Sandpainter and Medicine Man.

For explanation of legend of Whirling Logs and notes on the sandpainting see here. Additional Navajo sandpaintings can be viewed here.

Photograph courtesy of Nizhoni Cards.

jesus-perea:

Abstract composition 139
Giclee print - 60 x 80 c
Limited edition (25)
http://etsy.me/1bW10wR

jesus-perea:

Abstract composition 139

Giclee print - 60 x 80 c

Limited edition (25)

http://etsy.me/1bW10wR

georgianadesign:

CWB Architects in Brooklyn. 

georgianadesign:

CWB Architects in Brooklyn. 

georgianadesign:

A 200-year-old factory in Umbria transformed by designer Paola Navone. Via Dwell. (Yes, I’m a little obsessed with this custom tile.)

georgianadesign:

A 200-year-old factory in Umbria transformed by designer Paola Navone. Via Dwell. (Yes, I’m a little obsessed with this custom tile.)

arsvitaest:

Untitled [Woman Riding Moth]
Author: UnidentifiedDate: ca. 1950Medium: Gelatin silver printLocation: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

arsvitaest:

Untitled [Woman Riding Moth]

Author: Unidentified
Date: ca. 1950

Medium: Gelatin silver print
Location:
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

arsvitaest:

“Girl before a Mirror”
Author: Pablo Picasso  (Spanish, 1881-1973)Date: 1932Medium: Oil on canvasLocation: The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York
Girl before a Mirror shows Picasso’s young mistress Marie-Thérèse Walter, one of his favorite subjects in the early 1930s. Her white-haloed profile, rendered in a smooth lavender pink, appears serene. But it merges with a more roughly painted, frontal view of her face—a crescent, like the moon, yet intensely yellow, like the sun, and “made up” with a gilding of rouge, lipstick, and green eye-shadow. Perhaps the painting suggests both Walter’s day-self and her night-self, both her tranquillity and her vitality, but also the transition from an innocent girl to a worldly woman aware of her own sexuality.
It is also a complex variant on the traditional Vanity [or vanitas]—the image of a woman confronting her mortality in a mirror, which reflects her as a death’s head. On the right, the mirror reflection suggests a supernatural x-ray of the girl’s soul, her future, her fate.
— source

arsvitaest:

“Girl before a Mirror”

Author: Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973)
Date: 1932
Medium: Oil on canvas
Location: The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York

Girl before a Mirror shows Picasso’s young mistress Marie-Thérèse Walter, one of his favorite subjects in the early 1930s. Her white-haloed profile, rendered in a smooth lavender pink, appears serene. But it merges with a more roughly painted, frontal view of her face—a crescent, like the moon, yet intensely yellow, like the sun, and “made up” with a gilding of rouge, lipstick, and green eye-shadow. Perhaps the painting suggests both Walter’s day-self and her night-self, both her tranquillity and her vitality, but also the transition from an innocent girl to a worldly woman aware of her own sexuality.

It is also a complex variant on the traditional Vanity [or vanitas]—the image of a woman confronting her mortality in a mirror, which reflects her as a death’s head. On the right, the mirror reflection suggests a supernatural x-ray of the girl’s soul, her future, her fate.

source

arsvitaest:

Tenor trombone (buccin)
Origin: probably FranceDate: ca. 1830Location: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

arsvitaest:

Tenor trombone (buccin)

Origin: probably France
Date: ca. 1830
Location: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston